Use your DESIRES to evolve CONSCIOUSLY

What is the difference between Yoga and Tantra?

Tantra says you have to accept yourself as you are – do not restrain, just accept, but be aware and you will transcend. Yoga promotes restraint. both ways are acceptable. Tantra and Yoga may be two different manifestations but their genesis is the same.

How is that?

In tantra you accept yourself because that is the expression of your life, of your consciousness, in its natural course of evolution. Within us we have both ‘good’ and ‘bad’, creative and destructive. Usually, religions tell us to accept ‘good’ and reject ‘bad’ or negative aspects of our personality, but we, with our limited understanding, tend to mess things up. We try to change the pattern of our behavior and thinking. This enforced change within the personality is suppression of the normal expression which applies to all levels of our consciousness.

Tantra talks of the union of Shiva and Shakti. Shakti has nearly always been defined as kundalini, and Shiva, the male aspect, has been defined as chetana or consciousness. Tantra is not really referring to a physical relationship. It says that in order to experience internal union you first experience external union; to experience internal bliss, experience external bliss. The difference is momentary; internal bliss is continuous.

In Tantra there are initiations which are awakening of Shakti. The practice of asana is an initiation for the body. Pranayama is initiation of the pranas. The only difference between Tantra and Yoga is that Yoga is outgoing; it deals more with the world, body, mind, personality, emotions, actions and environment; whereas Tantra is more meditative.

You acquire desire because, for the evolution of consciousness, conflict is necessary. It is a means for awakening part of the consciousness. If there were no conflicts, there would be no evolution. There would be a stagnant state of consciousness.

How should we deal with desires?

We must accept them. If I desire to slap you, I should think of the repercussions it can have, positive or negative. If I simply follow my emotions there will be a big fight between us. this is where you have to learn to detach yourself. Both processes happen together. You allow emotions to flourish, observe them, and learn how to control them. You come to know when it is the right time for action and let that energy manifest. then this manifestation will be positive and creative, rather than haphazard.

Do men and women have different spiritual attributes?

Tantra believes that feminine energy is more refined and of higher quality than masculine energy. in Tantra the female principle has the position of guru, and the male principle that of a disciple.

Why is this so?

because of a woman’s ability to flow without any kind of intellectual barrier which binds one to the material level. Women have intuitive ability because theirs is a psychically active energy. Male energy is passive and seems to tend towards tunnel-vision. Women are able to perceive things which the male energy cannot. One must learn to flow with sensitivity; one must learn to flow with higher awareness.

Seven steps to sharpen IT managers resume

When was the last time you took a good hard look at your resume? Even if your job description hasn’t changed much recently, you don’t want to become complacent. You need to make sure your resume refl ects your latest accomplishments so that you can be next in line for a raise or poised to pounce on the opportunity that’s just around the corner. A resume revamp doesn’t have to be intimidating, either. In fact, in seven simple steps, your resume can refl ect the more accomplished IT manager you’ve become.

1. Look at the big picture. This pertains to printed resumes rather than text-based ones sent via the Web. What does your resume actually look like? Ignore the words for a moment. Is the layout clear and concise? Is the font easily readable? Remember that a sans serif font is harder to read that a serif font—though a sans serif font can look more modern. Choose your font size wisely; don’t go smaller than 11 pt type if you want anyone to read about all your accomplishments. Use bullet points, bold type, and spacing to help break up the information on the page.

2. Use strong action verbs to describe your job duties and accomplishments. You don’t want to present a laundry list of your day-to-day duties. Focus instead on the parts of your job that earn you recognition. Stress your leadership skills. For example, instead of writing that you are “involved in running a team of programmers and keeping projects on schedule,” try saying that you “manage a team that consistently meets deadlines.”

3. Be careful with your jargon. Is the important information readily accessible? If you’re job-hunting, remember that the people who initially screen resumes often have only basic technical knowledge; they might not know an MCSE from a CCNA. Don’t hide your strong points in language that no one outside your field can understand.

4. Ease up on the technical details. Remember, you’re in management now, and even though your tech skills got you where you are, it’s a different skill set that will propel you forward. Yes, you can—and should—list your technical skills, but make sure the focus is on how those skills help you manage people and technology more effectively.

5. Stress benefits, not features. Think back to your days as a hardware engineer, for example. Did you stress that the chip you designed replaced up to 10 discrete components or did you stress the greater product functionality and smaller device sizes that your customers could enjoy when they used your chip in their devices? Now, apply that logic to your resume. Don’t just say that you devised a new off-site backup strategy for the company. Point out that your off-site backup strategy reduced hardware and labor expenses by more than 50 percent, reduced downtime substantially, and increased client satisfaction 100 percent.

6. Put the bottom line on top. Translate each of your accomplishments into hours saved, money earned, and other tangible results for the company. If you can’t figure out how the things you do every day fit into the big picture, you’re doing something wrong. If you know what the moneymaking tasks are and you’re not finding time for them, you also need to reprioritize. Your resume should reflect the net worth you add to your organization.

7. Ask someone nontechnical to read your resume. If someone who isn’t especially tech savvy can read your resume and get a sense of what you do and why someone might hire you, your resume is definitely on the right track. If that person can also proofread, have them do it and your resume will quickly be ready for prime time.

These pointers were taken from the article “Seven ways to revamp your resume ,” by Abbi F. Perets.