What it takes to hold on to your principles – Would you walk like Sachin

Would you walk like Sachin

 

What does it take to hold on to principles?

How difficult is to be man of integrity in today’s world? But Sachin Tendulkar, stands on his principles no matter what. A great exhibition of his integrity was when Sachin Tendulkar walked out, without a backward glance, in India Vs West Indies world cup match, even when an Australian umpire Steve Davis declared him not out!

Sachin, did not hesitate for a second walked off. He knew he has nicked the ball and that was enough for him to walk off. This is not the first time, Sachin has always been a walker!

Ricky Ponting, Australian captain on the other hand, stood his ground even when he knew he has nicked the ball, while playing against Pakistan. He was declared not out but he did not walk off, after being reviewed he was declared out. In the post match interview, Pointing confessed, he knew he had nicked, but din’t walk off.

Sachin, being such a great cricketer, nobody ridicule’s him for holding on to the principles. But not everyone is Sachin.

Adam Gilchrist, another Australian, is one of the player who walks off. He has confessed he never had support from his team to walk off which made him feel isolated. He said, he felt selfish, as if he is walking for the sake of my own image, thereby everyone else look dishonest.

Principles are difficult to stand by, especially when others oppose. All of us have some principles, but they often become flexible, depending upon situation. You should always stand to your words, you should refuse to compromise under any circumstances, be in integrity. You’ll always have problems in doing so, but if you stand out you’ll always be happy deep within.

People in today’s world try to look good and avoid looking bad, thinking what others will think about them. It has become very difficult to be honest, but you should be honest with yourself, atleast!

To be true to yourself takes courage. It requires you to be introspective, sincere,open-minded and fair. It does not mean that you are inconsiderate or disrespectful of others. It means that you will not let others define you or make decisions for you that you should make for yourself.

Don’t listen to those who say, “It’s not done that way.” Maybe it’s not, but maybe you will. Don’t listen to those who say, “You’re taking too big a chance.” Michelangelo would have painted the Sistine floor, and it would surely be rubbed out by today. Most importantly, don’t listen when the little voice of fear inside of you rears its ugly head and says, “They’re all smarter than you out there. They’re more talented, they’re taller, blonder, prettier, luckier and have connections…” I firmly believe that if you follow a path that interests you, not to the exclusion of love, sensitivity, and cooperation with others, but with the strength of conviction that you can move others by your own efforts, and do not make success or failure the criteria by which you live, the chances are you’ll be a person worthy of your own respect.–Neil Simon